Birding

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Place Category: ExplorePlace Tags: birding, birds, butterflies, and butterfly

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  • This is a very unique area! We’re on the south range of many of the Northern species and on the edge of some of the Southern birds as well. We have a great variety of habitats, bogs, marshes and conifer forests. Lake Superior acts as a corridor for migrating birds and insects. They follow the shoreline because its productive for food and cover.

    There is no off-season for birding in Washburn and its surrounding areas. For a rare chance at seeing Spruce Grouse and Borial Chickaddes, one only needs to travel 20 or so minutes from Washburn.

    Snowy Owls, Northern Finches and Cross Bills are a find in the Winter.
    Spring brings Warblers, Fly Catchers and other Tropical migrants.
    During Spring and Fall you can see most species of Waterfowl, including 3 species of Scoters and the beautiful Wood Duck.

    The Tundra, Mute, and Trumpeter Swans spend time here with Spring and Fall visits by Pelicans.

    This is also a terrific area for butterflies. Such as, the unique greenish blues, the Green Coma and Bog Coppers. Washburn is a great Dragonfly habitat, as well.

    Whether you’re a die hard or “just looking” your chances are pretty good you can find many differenct species of birds and insects here in Washburn!

    Observation sites:
    Birds and Mammals:
    Thompson’s West End Park
    Washburn Walking Trail
    Lakeshore behind the Water treatment plant
    Coal Dock
    Memorial Park
    Big Rock County Park
    Friendly Valley Road
    Mouth of Souix River
    Bayview Park and Road
    Voight Fish Hatchery
    Birch Grove Campground
    Fish Creek Marsh

    Butterflies:
    Washburn gardens and boulevards
    Coal Dock
    Northern Great Lakes Visitor Center
    Brink’s Road (FR236)
    Fireroad 444
    Moquah Barrens Wildlife Area (FR407)
    FR237 (Pipeline)
    Pine Lake
    Long Lake
    Lost Creek Marsh and Bog (Cornucopia)
    Bayview Park and Road

    Dragonflies and Damsilflies:
    Long Lake
    Arneson Road and Ponds
    Rib Lake
    Pine Lake
    Perch Lake (HWY C)
    Harker’s Lake
    Bayview Park (Green-Striped Darner)
    Voight Fish Hatchery
    Red Cliff Fish Hatchery
    Aquaculture Center
    Lost Creek Marsh and Bog (Cornucopia)

    Special Thank you to David A. Bratley for compiling all this information.

    Photos by Dave Hanson, Nick Anich and Wayne Rundell.

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